Practice Advice

The College of Massage Therapists of Ontario provides its registrants with access to professional practice guidance through its on-staff Practice Specialist.

The Practice Specialist can assist you in finding the relevant legislative or policy-oriented information needed to support you in providing the best possible practice for clients. While unable to provide legal or financial advice, the Practice Specialist can provide coaching to registrants as they work through the ethical decision-making process to develop their own course of action in response to their particular practice dilemma.

This process, which is presented at the College’s Professionalism Workshop, provides registrants with a framework within which to explore their issue, reflect on possible solutions and to test these solutions before taking action. This is done using the College’s regulations, policies, standards and bulletins as guidelines for what the minimum expectations are of Massage Therapists. These guidelines are the expression of the public’s expectations for Massage Therapy care, as well as the generally accepted practices understood and utilized by the profession.

Frequently Asked Questions

The Practice Specialist has developed a series of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) by subject area that relate to common questions received from registrants.  Please review the FAQs before contacting the College with your question.

Advertising/Discounts/Fees

Does the College have a guideline on standard fees for Massage Therapy services?

The College does not offer any specific guidelines for fees. However, RMTs may not charge or accept a fee or amount that is excessive or unreasonable in relation to the services performed or charge a fee in excess of the posted fees, without the prior agreement of the client.  The Registered Massage Therapists’ Association of Ontario (RMTAO) is the professional association, which offers a fee guideline that is available to Massage Therapists and the public. This information can be accessed through the RMTAO website.

What are the average rates/fees charged by Massage Therapists and are they the same across Ontario?

The fees charged by RMTs must be reasonable.  Section 26, paragraph 31 of Ontario Regulation 544/94 as amended states that it is an act of professional misconduct for “Charging or accepting a fee or amount that is excessive or unreasonable in relation to the services performed.” Paragraph 32 states that it is an act of professional misconduct for “Failing to post, in a location within the practice premises that is readily visible to members of the public, the fees for professional services provided by the member.” 

 For a fee schedule, please refer to the Registered Massage Therapists’ Association of Ontario (RMTAO) website.

Can I charge a different fee from my posted fee?

According to the Massage Therapy Act, 1991 a registrant can charge a fee that is less than their posted fee as long as they note the amount charged and reason for the fee in the client’s record.  Registrants can also charge a fee that is greater than the posted fee with the client’s prior consent. Please refer to Standard 2 – Inform the Client of the Fees and Obtain His/Her Agreement to a Fee Schedule and s. 26 paragraphs 31 – 36, Business Practices, of Ontario Regulation 544/94 as amended.

Can RMTs provide discounts/promotions/free giveaways to clients?

Massage therapy is a regulated healthcare profession in Ontario.  Registered Massage Therapists are responsible for providing high quality, safe and ethical care and in order to provide this they are often only able to treat a limited number of clients per day. Advertising a discount is practice which is not supported by many Massage Therapists, although Registered Massage Therapists may certainly charge a fee less that their posted fee on a case by case basis depending on client need.  There is a concern amongst Registered Massage Therapists that if a discount were to be applied, the client paying the reduced fee may not receive the same attention and time that a client paying the full amount might receive. The College appeals to RMTs to ensure they use their professional judgment so as not to compromise the care they provide or to put the reputation of the profession in disrepute.

The cost of the massage treatment is only one factor in the selection of an RMT and should not be the only piece of information considered by the public when choosing a therapist. Registered Massage Therapists are encouraged to provide information through their advertisements about Regulation and how it helps to assure the public that they will receive safe and ethical care. Explaining to the public that Registered Massage Therapists participate in a Quality Assurance programme which encourages continuing competence, receive education about maintaining professional boundaries and abuse prevention, meet specified registration criteria , have passed an entry to practice competency examination and are held accountable for the care they provide through the processes of Professional Conduct, registrants can provide much needed information to the public to help them decide whom to receive Massage Therapy care from. 

What are the advertising guidelines for Massage Therapy?

The College has a policy and Regulation on advertising. Please refer to the College’s Advertising Policy and the Advertising Regulation (Part II Advertising).

Business Concerns and HST

Do Massage Therapists have to collect Harmonized Sales Tax (HST)?

As of July 1, 2010, Massage Therapists are required to collect HST.  For further information regarding HST and its collection, please refer to the Canada Revenue Agency website.

Where can I get information about HST collection and procedures?

Providing information regarding HST is not within the College’s mandate. Excellent information on this topic is provided by the Registered Massage Therapists’ Association of Ontario (RMTAO) and the Canada Revenue Agency. Massage Therapists should also obtain the services of an accountant for advice on how to collect and pay HST. Some accountants will include HST remittance in their services. 

Can the College help me review the employment contract the employer wants me to sign?                 

Contractual or business concerns do not fall within the mandate of the College. Whenever reviewing a contract or business agreement, RMTs are advised to review their legislative requirements and consider how they can be implemented in relation to the business needs of the environment, especially in the situation where they may be working for/with an establishment that is not owned by a regulated health professional.  The Registered Massage Therapists’ Association of Ontario (RMTAO) is a source of information or advice regarding the best practice when establishing a contract or business agreement.  Massage Therapists are encouraged to seek legal advice from a lawyer familiar with the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 and other relevant health law in Ontario.  To find a lawyer, please refer to the Law Society of Upper Canada.

Does the College have a template for a privacy policy that I can use?

The College does not provide privacy policy templates because privacy policies must be developed in conjunction with the operating processes and policies of the individual business. The College has developed Guidelines to help RMTs create their Privacy policies.

Information can also be found on the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario website, which provides information on both the provincial privacy legislation, Personal Health Information Protection Act, 2004 (PHIPA) and the federal privacy legislation, Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, 2000 (PIPEDA).  These pieces of legislation outline statutory requirements in relation to privacy of client personal and personal health information.

What do I need to know about working from my home?

All the Regulations, Standards of Practice, policies, position statements and guidelines apply regardless of whether the Massage Therapy practice is located in a home, a spa or a mobile clinic. Refer to Standard 1 – Prepare the Treatment Area. Client health records and files must be kept in accordance with applicable Regulations, Standards of Practice and policies, even working off-site such as when visiting a client’s home for the treatment.  Review all of the College’s Standards and Policies as well as provincial regulations.

Client Relations

I have a client who is behaving inappropriately. What can I do?

In cases of abusive behaviour, Massage Therapists are encouraged to  discuss their concerns with the client, if appropriate  and let the client know that they will be unable to continue treatment if the behaviour continues. Refer to Standard 16 – Discharge a Client. RMTs are advised that it is professional misconduct to fail to make arrangements for continuing care that is needed when they are discharging clients from their practice. The professional misconduct regulations can be accessed on the Service Ontario e-laws site.

Can I limit my practice to only men or only women?

RMTs are expected to uphold Principle 1 – Respect for Persons of the College\’s Code of Ethics which speaks to the commitment to practise without discrimination. Massage Therapists are also responsible for upholding the provisions of Ontario’s Human Rights Code:

This Code applies to all residents of Ontario and states:

“Every person has a right to equal treatment with respect to services, goods and facilities, without discrimination because of race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, family status or disability.”

As regulated healthcare professionals, RMTs are expected to  treat all clients and potential clients equally and fairly and without discrimination.

Can I accept tips?

The College has received calls of complaint from RMTs, other health care professionals and members of the public regarding tipping. While the College currently does not have a formal position on tipping, registrants are asked to carefully think about how accepting a tip contributes to the perception that Massage Therapy is not a regulated healthcare profession but part of the service industry. The College is working with other provincial associations toward a future where Massage Therapy is regulated across Canada, with national competency standards, and is respected and valued as a provider of safe and effective healthcare to all Canadians. Accepting tips is not in keeping with this vision.

Some of the tipping scenarios recently reported to the College included envelopes being handed to the client with strong suggestion that a tip was expected and to be placed in the envelope upon payment. Other scenarios included reports from Massage Therapists who heard media broadcasts discussing how much to tip the Massage Therapist as though it is  a customary and established tradition. Tipping is not an established tradition in the profession and has only begun to increase through the association of Massage Therapists with spas.  The Client Relations Committee of the College will be reviewing tipping with the view to creating guidelines.

Conflict of Interest and Dual Relationship

Are RMTs permitted to enter into a relationship with their clients outside of the therapeutic relationship?

Having any type of relationship with a client outside of the therapeutic relationship is considered a dual relationship. Dual relationships are risky in that the potential for conflict of interest and abuse increases greatly as the principle of client-centered healthcare is jeopardized.

The College has a position statement regarding this issue, entitled Post-termination Relationships. The position statement specifically refers to dual relationships of a sexual nature. The position statement discusses the importance of professional boundaries and how they are essential to maintaining client-centered care.  It is the opinion of the College that dual relationships are to be avoided. Having a sexual relationship with a person while they are also a client is NEVER permissible. More information can be obtained by referring to the College’s bulletin; Preventing Sexual Abuse.

Are RMTs permitted to treat family members?

The College currently does not have a specific Regulation or policy on Conflict of Interest.  Massage Therapists must use their professional judgment if treating family members.  Treating a family member is considered a dual relationship and is often perceived as a conflict of interest, whether or not an actual conflict of interest exists. If treating a family member, RMTs must make sure they are able to provide objective, client-centred care and ensure that all regulatory requirements are upheld,  i.e., maintaining client confidentiality, applying the Standards of Practice etc..  Many insurance companies have their own policies about this issue and may not reimburse claims submitted, particularly if the RMT and the client reside at the same address. Massage Therapists are responsible for their decision to treat a family member and must be prepared to explain their rationale for doing so.

Employer Information

Can RMTs take the client files with them when they leave their place of employment?

The College’s Regulations specify that records must be kept for each client and lists the information to be recorded. The College specifies that the files must be retained but does not specify who should retain them. Regardless of who retains them, the files should be maintained for a minimum of 10 years from the date of the last treatment for adult clients or for 10 years following their 18th birthday  for clients under the age of 18. RMTs must have access to the records for a variety of reasons, including:

  • To provide  a copy of the record to a client upon their written request;
  • To provide  a copy to the College, if the College has received a complaint against the therapist or has reason to investigate the therapist’s practice;
  • To use in defence of the therapist should he/she be sued by a client.

Responsibility for and access to the files can be dealt with in the following ways:

  • The RMT may maintain his/her own records and take them with him/her when leaving the clinic;
  • The RMT may agree that the records stay at  the clinic but obtain an agreement in writing that the clinic will follow the College’s requirements and allow the therapist access to the records even after leaving;
  • Both may agree that the records stay at the clinic but that when leaving the clinic the RMT will photocopy all the records for which they have had professional responsibility.

The decision about what to do with the files when a Massage Therapist leaves your clinic can be dealt with by creating a contract with them that clearly states what you will do with the client’s file.  Making these decisions in advance of your employment of, or association with the Massage Therapist, will prevent disputes when the Massage Therapist leaves the association with your clinic.

Can you recommend a Massage Therapist?

The College of Massage Therapists of Ontario maintains a public register of all RMTs. The College does not recommend therapists. If you would like to confirm if someone is registered please use our Search for an RMT function. 

Can the owner of a clinic, who is not a registrant of the College, ask a Massage Therapist to do something that is contrary to the Regulations of the College?

Business owners frequently have business demands that may run contrary to the provisions of the Regulated Health Professions Act (RHPA). As a registrant of the College, the RMT is expected to uphold the Regulations of the College regardless of contrary demands. The RMT may wish to discuss their obligations with the business owner to determine if there are ways to satisfy the needs of both parties.

I would like to hire a Massage Therapist. How can I advertise a job opening?

The professional association, the Registered Massage Therapists’ Association of Ontario (RMTAO), posts employment opportunities. 

Some Massage Therapy schoolsassist graduates who have become registered with the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario with job placements. Details on placement arrangements can be obtained by contacting the schools directly. 

Leaving a Practice

If I leave my current practice, what are my responsibilities to my clients?

When an RMT decides to leave a practice, clients must be informed and arrangements must be made for the continuance of any necessary treatment.

Please refer to the College’s policy on Record Retention for information on managing client files. The policy states:

“The departing Massage Therapist has a responsibility to contact clients and notify them that he/she is leaving the practice. This may be done in person, by telephone or by letter. The purpose of this contact is to assist the client with the transfer of care to another provider, if necessary, and to advise them of how they can access their health record in the future.”

In the event that the business owner will not permit the RMT to personally contact the clients, the therapist can make an arrangement to have someone from the clinic contact the clients to assist them with continuity of care. Massage Therapists are advised that failure to make arrangements for continuing care that is needed,  is considered to be abandonment of a client and may be grounds for charges of professional misconduct. The professional misconduct regulations can be accessed on the Service Ontario e-laws site.

What happens to my client files if I leave my current practice?

It is the RMT’s responsibility to ensure that client files are maintained in accordance with Regulation.  Section 11 (5), Part III Records, of Ontario Regulation 544/94 as amended states:

11. (5) “every client health record shall be retained for at least 10 years following,
(a) the client’s last visit; or
(b) if the client was less than 18 years old at the time of his or her last visit, the day the client became or would become 18 years old.” 

This can be done by either retaining possession of the files personally, or in the case of a clinic retaining possession, ensuring that the RMTs have a copy of the original file or appropriate access to the files for the duration the Act specifies. It is important that all clients are made aware that they can access their files at any time should they wish to have a copy.

Am I allowed to sell my practice?

Massage Therapists are permitted to sell their practices. The College does not provide advice on how to go about selling a practice. RMTs should speak to a lawyer, accountant or business consultant.  When selling a practice, therapists must take particular care around the managing of client health history files.   Refer to the Records Retention policy as noted above.  It is important to remember that client files, while in the therapist’s possession, are still the properties of the client, and therefore cannot be “sold,” only transferred.  Information can also be obtained from the Registered Massage Therapist Association of Ontario (RMTAO).

The employer/owner says I can’t let my clients know that I am leaving or where I am going because they consider it to be solicitation of clients and they may sue me.  Is this true?

As regulated health professionals, RMTs are required by the Massage Therapy Act 1991 to notify all their clients of their intent to leave an existing practice. Failure to do so could be perceived as abandoning clients which is considered professional misconduct.  The College also requires RMTs to make arrangements with clients for continuing care that is needed.  Simple provision of this important information may not necessarily be solicitation. If there is a concern, RMTs are advised to make an agreement with the owner to have someone else from the clinic contact the clients to let them know the Massage Therapist is leaving the clinic and to make arrangements for continuing care and possible transfer of health history records. Refer to the Record Retention policy.  

Modalities

What distinguishes RMTs from other people who offer massage or massage-related therapies?

Ontario RMTs go through an extensive training programme, concluding with Certification Examinations which if successful, permit them to become registered with the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario and to use the protected title of Massage Therapist or Registered Massage Therapist (RMT) (these two terms mean the same thing). RMTs are governed by the provisions of the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 (RHPA) in Ontario.  Being a “member”, a “registrant” or “registered” with the College means that RMTs are held accountable for the care they provide through the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario which is the regulator (not an educational facility) of the profession. Regulation is very important to the public’s safety and well being. members of the public can feel more secure when choosing a Registered Massage Therapist knowing that they have the necessary training and accountability to ensure the highest quality standards and the safest and ethical treatment of their clients. 

Can I provide complementary modalities as a Massage Therapist?

The College has determined that there are certain modalities which, while not fitting the definition of the scope of practice, may be complementary to Massage Therapy treatments.

Section 3 of the Massage Therapy Act, 1991 states:

“The practice of Massage Therapy is the assessment of the soft tissue and joints of the body and the treatment and prevention of physical dysfunction and pain of the soft tissues and joints by manipulation to develop, maintain, rehabilitate or augment physical function, or relieve pain.”

There are a number of modalities that can be integrated into a treatment plan by a Massage Therapist, and may even be accepted and taught in recognized massage educational institutions. These modalities,  if used exclusively in and of themselves, would not fall within the generally accepted practice of the profession. 

Therapists are given reasonable and responsible latitude with respect to the use of complementary modalities, recognizing that they are accountable to ensure that the modality is integrated into a treatment plan that largely consists of modalities in scope.

Massage Therapists who provide complementary modalities must understand their professional accountability and that they are responsible for:

  • Following the Code of Ethics, the Standards of Practice, and the Regulations;
  • Determining the appropriateness of the complementary modality;
  • Ensuring that they have the knowledge, skill, and judgment to perform the modality competently;
  • Performing an assessment of clients before providing the treatment;
  • Explaining to the client the anticipated effects, the potential benefits, and the potential risks of the proposed modality so the client can make an informed choice;
  • Obtaining valid consent before beginning treatment;
  • Evaluating the ongoing status of the client and the effects of the modality on the client’s condition and overall health.

RMTs teaching a complementary modality should note that teaching a course on a complementary modality is not considered practising Massage Therapy.

Registrants are reminded that the complementary modalities therapists engage in under this policy are not considered Massage Therapy and that they may not be billed as Massage Therapy as such if performed on their own. However, they may be billed as Massage Therapy if they are integrated into a treatment plan. Activities carried out by a therapist or a health profession corporation beyond the strict practice of Massage Therapy may not be covered under the registrant’s professional liability insurance and it may be necessary to make arrangements for separate insurance coverage for these activities.

How do I find out if a particular technique or modality is within the scope of practice of Massage Therapy?

In the interest of client safety and to help ensure the competence of registrants, Massage Therapists are expected to practise within their scope of practice and are expected to use their professional judgment when deciding to use a particular modality. The scope of practice is a description of the expertise and training of the profession. The Massage Therapy scope of practice is found in section 3 of the Massage Therapy Act, 1991.

It is expected that when providing care, RMTs rely on the Massage Therapy Competency Standards, the profession’s knowledge base obtained through their Massage Therapy training, to determine the appropriate treatment plan for the client, based on the assessment. If, while developing the treatment plan, it is determined that a modality not originally taught in the Massage Therapy programme is more appropriate, the RMT must consider several factors before proceeding. The first thing that needs to be considered is whether or not the particular modality is the best choice for treatment for the client and why.  Massage Therapists must then consider whether the new technique will provide an assessment of the soft tissue and joints of the body, treat and prevent physical dysfunction of the soft tissue and joints, develop, maintain, rehabilitate or augment physical function, or relieve pain through the use of manipulation.  If so, then it can be argued that this new technique fits within the scope of practice and the RMT can proceed once they have received informed consent from the client.   

Question: Can/should we also refer people to policy on complementary modalities?

Is acupuncture considered within the Massage Therapy scope of practice, and if so, can I do acupuncture and include it in a Massage Therapy receipt?

Acupuncture can be practised by RMTs only if it is provided within the Massage Therapy scope of practice and the RMT has successfully completed acupuncture training that has been approved by the College. Refer to the College’s policies on Acupuncture and Approved Acupuncture Educational Training Programs (Coming Soon).

A Massage Therapy assessment must first be conducted in accordance with the Standards of Practice. If it is determined that acupuncture is an appropriate treatment for the presenting soft tissue condition, the Massage Therapist can incorporate this into the treatment plan design. Acupuncture becomes a modality used in the treatment. Because the acupuncture policy requires acupuncture to be provided only within the scope of practice of the profession, acupuncture cannot be used for smoking cessation, for example. RMTs must also provide acupuncture in accordance with Standard 2 – Perform an Acupuncture Treatment of the Additional Technique Standards. If acupuncture is performed within the Massage Therapy scope of practice and in accordance with the Standards of Practice, it may be billed as Massage Therapy.

Massage Therapists may not use traditional Chinese medicine practitioner or acupuncturist, an abbreviation or variation in another language as that title will be reserved only for registrants of the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of Ontario (CTCMPAO). If Massage Therapists want to provide acupuncture outside the scope of practice of Massage Therapy, they must become registrants of the CTCMPAO.

Motor Vehicle Accident and Other Insurance

Can the College provide information on the Motor Vehicle Accident Insurance claims process?

No, the College does not provide information regarding MVA insurance claims. This information can be found through the Registered Massage Therapists’ Association of Ontario (RMTAO) or the Health Claims for Auto Insurance (HCAI) website, which contains all pertinent information regarding dealing with MVA claims. 

Record-keeping and Receipts

Is there a difference in the receipts I provide based on practice type and location I am working at?

The information to be recorded on receipts remains the same regardless of the practice type and location of the practice.  Please refer to the College’s policy on receipts (links you to About the Profession – Policies & Publications — Policies) to review the specific information that must be included on a receipt.

Should I write a receipt for someone redeeming a gift certificate?

A receipt must be provided any time a payment is made to record details about the transaction. A receipt must be an accurate record of the transaction that took place.  It is considered unusual to provide a receipt for redemption of a gift certificate because no payment was provided (the money would have been provided to purchase a gift certificate). If a receipt is provided there should be no dollar value given to the receipt and the receipt should state “gift certificate redeemed” in the amount paid section. Refer to the College’s Policy on Receipts for additional information.

Must I retain custody of the files even when I leave a practice?

The answer depends on what the contract with the clinic associates specifies about custody of files.  Section 11 (5), Part III Records, of Ontario Regulation 544/94 as amended states:

11. (5) “every client health record shall be retained for at least 10 years following,
(a) the client’s last visit; or
(b) if the client was less than 18 years old at the time of his or her last visit, the day the client became or would become 18 years old.” 

It is the RMT’s responsibility to ensure that client files are maintained in accordance with Regulation.  Regulation does not specify that the Massage Therapist must maintain possession of the health records they created, only that they must be able to access them if necessary and that the files are maintained in a secure and confidential manner.

Maintaining access can be achieved in a number of ways, such as by obtaining a written agreement indicating that the clinic will retain custody of the file but will give the RMT access upon their written request for a period of 10 years. Custody of the files is a civil matter that does not involve the College. These types of disputes must be solved through your lawyer. For further information on what to do with client files upon leaving a practice, please refer to the College’s policy on Record Retention. Personal health information in the files must also be managed in accordance with the clinic’s Privacy Policy.

Regulatory Requirements

Do I have to maintain current CPR and First Aid if I am a registrant?                 

Current CPR and First Aid Certificate submissions are required for examination candidates and initial registration only.

What happens if I do not want my business address given out to members of the public?

It is mandated by legislation that the public Register contain each registrant’s name and business address (RHPA, The Code, S.23 (2)(A)(3)1).

Do you put advertisements in your newsletter? Do you have job postings?

No. The mandate of the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario as specified in the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 is to protect the public interest by developing programmes that encourage and guide Massage Therapists to practise safely and ethically. The RMTAO does list job postings on its website.

Who licenses Private Career Colleges and Community Colleges permitting them to operate Massage Therapy programmes?

The Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities is responsible for licensing schools. The College of Massage Therapists is only consulted on whether the proposed academic programmes meet the College’s Massage Therapy Competency Standards.

The owner of the clinic, who is not a registrant of the College, is asking me to do something that is contrary to the Regulations of the College. Can they do this?

Business owners frequently have business demands that may run contrary to the provisions of the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991. As a registrant of the College, the RMT is expected to uphold the Regulations of the College regardless of contrary demands. The RMT may wish to discuss their obligations with the business owner to determine if there are ways to satisfy the needs of both parties.

How do I get a new copy of the Regulations?

Regulations and other pertinent legislative information can be downloaded from the Service Ontario e-laws website.

What are the College’s Regulations for Massage Therapists regarding their place of employment?

RMTs are required to uphold all the College’s Regulations and policies regardless of the type of setting worked in. Professional judgment must be used to determine how to manage issues arising in the workplace in accordance with professional obligations. While College policies and Regulations are intended to govern the conduct of Massage Therapists in relation to their clients, implementation of them may have unintended effects on the workplace and the relationships between the associates of the clinic.

Where can I get access to the Massage Therapy Act or the Regulated Health Professions Act?

These Acts can be accessed online through the Service Ontario e-laws website. This website provides access to all legislation in Ontario as well as information regarding the process for approving legislation. Once on the website, click on the “search or browse current or consolidated laws” button and this will bring up a search window. Legislation is stored in alphabetical order. You will also note the “+” sign to the left of the Act. If you click on this “+” sign, all Regulations associated with that Act will open. The College’s professional misconduct Regulations are found by clicking on the “General” Regulation.

Where can I find the information on the College’s Professional Misconduct Regulations?

The College’s Professional Misconduct Regulations are found by locating the Massage Therapy Act, 1991, by clicking on ‘M’ in the Service Ontario e-laws website. You will also note the “+” sign to the left of the Act. If you click on this “+” sign, all Regulations associated with the Act will open. The Misconduct Regulations are found in the General Regulation (O.Reg. 544/94, section VII)

External Resources

Questions not covered by the FAQs may be addressed by other information resources. Registrants with questions that fall outside the College’s jurisdiction may refer to the following Resource List which references a number of useful external websites than can answer many of the questions most typically received by the College.

Resource List

Resource

 

Description

Canada Revenue Agency

Information regarding GST/HST issues, as well as information regarding income tax obligations

College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of Ontario

The regulatory College for those registered as Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists.  Questions regarding the use of acupuncture can be directed here. 

 

E-laws – Government of Ontario 

Listing of all Ontario legislation, including The Massage Therapy Act (MTA), The Regulated Health Act (RHPA), The Personal Health Information and Protection Act (PHIPA), etc.

Federation of Health Regulatory Colleges of Ontario         

Umbrella organization made up of all of Ontario’s health regulatory colleges, including the CMTO.

 

Financial Services Commission of Ontario

General information regarding auto insurance, including filing guidelines for auto insurance.

 

Health Claims for Auto Insurance

Offers health care providers valuable information and aid when working with MVA claims.

 

Health Professions Regulatory Advisory Council (HPRAC)

The Council which reports to the Minister of Health and Long Term Care regarding client relations among the regulated health professionals.                                       

Law Society of Upper Canada

The Law Society of Upper Canada which offers information regarding locating a lawyer.

 

Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner

Protection of personal privacy in Ontario, including privacy of personal health information. Offers many useful guidelines regarding personal health information privacy, including that of client files.

 

Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

Information for health care providers in the event of a provincial health crisis/pandemic.

 

Registered Massage Therapists’ Association of Ontario

Information regarding the day-to-day practice of a RMT, such as fee schedule, HST, business contract issues.

 

Workplace Safety and Insurance Board

Workplace safety and Insurance Board which offers valuable information regarding WSIB claim

Insurance Bureau of Canada

Insurance Bureau of Canada is the national industry association representing Canada’s private home, car and business insurers.

 

Report Insurance Crime
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Contacting the Practice Specialist

If you have a question which is not answered in the FAQs or through the external resources, please e-mail the College at with “Practice Advice Question” in the subject line or contact the Practice Specialist directly at ; 416-489-2626 ext 124.